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Home arrow eBook Categories arrow Social Science arrow Living Homes for Cultural Expression

Living Homes for Cultural Expression

May 04 2009

Living Homes for Cultural Expression: North American Native Perspectives on Creating Community MuseumsThis one-of-a-kind compilation of essays by eleven noted Native museum professionals, whose intimate portraits explore the theory and practice of museum planning for indigenous communities, is paired with a comprehensive directory of more than 200 tribal museums and cultural centers in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Living Homes for Cultural Expression: North American Native Perspectives on Creating Community Museums features essays by eleven noted Native museum professionals, whose varied experiences in creating tribal museums come together in this compact and instructive collection.

These intimate portraits, which explore the theory and practice of museum planning for indigenous communities, are paired with a comprehensive directory of more than 200 tribal museums and cultural centers in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Contributing authors include Janine Bowechop (Makah), executive director of the Makah Cultural and Research Center in Neah Bay, Wash.; Richard W. Hill Sr. (Tuscarora), guest lecturer at the Six Nations Polytechnic in Ohsweken, Ontario, Canada; Irvine Scalplock (Blackfoot), director of the Culture and Heritage Center at Siksika Nation, Alberta, Canada; and Susan Secakuku (Hopi), an independent consultant on tribal museum- and culture-related projects.

The National Museum of the American Indian published Living Homes for Cultural Expressions as a tool for use in Indian Country, serving the museum’s continuing efforts to form partnerships and collaborations with Native tribes, museums, and cultural centers throughout the Americas.

Visit Living Homes for Cultural Expression: North American Native Perspectives on Creating Community Museums Download Page

You can download full publication in PDF format for FREE!

KAREN COODY COOPER & NICOLASA I. SANDOVAL
National Museum of the American Indian
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, D.C., and New York

PREFACE
If two words were to describe the mission of the National Museum of the American Indian, they would be “cultural continuance.”What makes our efforts unique throughout mainstream museum work is that our exhibitions and programs are grounded in the authority of the Native perspective.

Part of our ongoing outreach efforts—and the one that we hope this book will address—is assisting Native communities as they interpret, collect, and care for their own collections, thereby making Native voices heard by the museum community at large.

There are about 200 Native community museums in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. It is important to note that the terms “Native community museum” or “tribal museum” used in this book do not simply refer to museums with a collection of Native American materials. We have looked, rather, to the type of authority that governs these museums as a way to more accurately define them. Museums that retain Native authority through direct tribal ownership or majority presence, or that are located on tribally controlled lands, or that have a Native director or board members are the institutions that meet our criteria. ...

FORWARD
This assembly of stories—from an Alutiiq community on Alaska’s Kodiak Island to Hopi people in Arizona—speaks to the concerns and aspirations that unite indigenous peoples in the lands known now as the Americas.

The wealth of knowledge brimming from these accounts informs and inspires those who have chosen a journey of great challenges and greater rewards—that of creating a tribal museum. The path of life knows no finite borders or clear maps. There are only moments in time throughout the journey where we find safe places to be who we are and to define ourselves in our own terms.

The National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) continues to play a vital role as both a haven and hub for many beautifully radiant forms of expression.The hemispheric scope of perspectives presented at the NMAI affirms its commitment to education and public service, which transcends boundaries and narrows distances between people. ...

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Last Updated ( May 04 2009 )
 
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